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Cobra Gold 19: Pilot's best friend

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis, 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, gives the 35th Fighter Squadron's "Push It Up!" sign during Exercise Cobra Gold 2019 at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, Feb. 19, 2019. Cobra Gold participants conduct multinational force, combined task force events that are vital to maintaining the readiness and interoperability of security forces across the region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Savannah L. Waters)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis, 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, gives the 35th Fighter Squadron's "Push It Up!" sign during Exercise Cobra Gold 2019 at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, Feb. 19, 2019. Cobra Gold participants conduct multinational force, combined task force events that are vital to maintaining the readiness and interoperability of security forces across the region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Savannah L. Waters)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis (left), 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, helps Airman 1st Class Jacob Davignon (right), 8th AMXS crew chief, locate a brake piston on the wheel of a USAF F-16 Fighting Falcon during Exercise Cobra Gold 2019 at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, Feb. 19, 2019. Cobra Gold is a Thai-U.S. co-sponsored exercise that promotes regional partnerships to advance security cooperation in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Savannah L. Waters)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis (left), 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, helps Airman 1st Class Jacob Davignon (right), 8th AMXS crew chief, locate a brake piston on the wheel of a USAF F-16 Fighting Falcon during Exercise Cobra Gold 2019 at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, Feb. 19, 2019. Cobra Gold is a Thai-U.S. co-sponsored exercise that promotes regional partnerships to advance security cooperation in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Savannah L. Waters)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis, 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, inspects a USAF F-16 Fighting Falcon brake during Exercise Cobra Gold 2019 at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, Feb. 19, 2019. Cobra Gold provides a venue for both U.S. and partner nations to advance interoperability and increase partner capacity in planning and executing complex and realistic multinational force and combined task force operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Savannah L. Waters)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis, 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, inspects a USAF F-16 Fighting Falcon brake during Exercise Cobra Gold 2019 at Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, Feb. 19, 2019. Cobra Gold provides a venue for both U.S. and partner nations to advance interoperability and increase partner capacity in planning and executing complex and realistic multinational force and combined task force operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Savannah L. Waters)

KORAT, Thailand -- On a flight line shrouded in a constant haze and tortured by Thailand’s relentless sun, the sounds of jet engines and jungle birds fill the ears of U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Travis Davis, 8th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief; a best friend to any 35th Fighter Squadron pilot who puts their trust in crew chiefs like Davis every time they fly.

While executing U.S. Indo-Pacific Command objectives and U.S. Pacific Air Forces priorities at Korat Royal Thai Air Force base, Davis and 114 other maintainers from the 8th Fighter Wing, Kunsan Air Base, Republic of Korea, safely deployed, are operating and will redeploy 12 Wolf Pack F-16 Fighting Falcons loaded with full-scale-heavy-weight-munitions supporting of Exercise Cobra Gold 2019. Cobra Gold is a Thai-U.S. co-sponsored exercise that promotes regional partnerships to advance security cooperation in the Indo-Pacific region and is one of the longest-running international exercises.

Sgt. Davis and other maintainers quickly adapted to operating in a hot and humid environment alongside their Royal Thai Air Force partners, and as the sun shines, they’re reminded of the winter conditions of home-station.

"I like my job, but there are people who don't necessarily enjoy it due to extreme cold or hot weather conditions," said Davis. "Especially when we are busy and breaks are hard to come by, but the mission comes first."

Davis advises fellow crew chiefs in maintaining, servicing and inspecting the F-16 Fighting Falcon. His inspector role ensures 8th AMXS Airmen are equipped with the proper tools and skill sets to get the job done as safely and efficiently as possible, while keeping those who fly the jets reassured that they’re sitting in a well taken care of and lethal jet.

"As a crew chief, you need to keep your head on a swivel, and make sure to pay attention to what you're doing," Davis said. "You have someone else's life in your hands, and mistakes can quickly escalate into a life or death situation. We can always replace parts here and there, but we can't replace a person."

Consistency is very important, Davis said, and a mistake on a crew chief's part creates the potential for loss, whether it's a 35 million dollar aircraft or a precious life.

With no U.S. aircraft maintenance support, Davis and other 8th AMXS maintainers learned to operate in conditions that are similar to a bare base during Cobra Gold 19. Weapons, avionics, and other maintenance specialists assisted crew chiefs in launching aircraft by aiding as a “B man,” and egress technicians supplemented crash and recovery teams to build F-16 tires.

Regular maintenance, inspections, refueling, launch and recovery is a lot of work, said Davis, but combining hands-on efforts across the 8th MXG enabled smoother transitions throughout the exercise.

"Cross utilization of maintainers of different AFSCs and roles is a true embodiment of maintainers making the mission happen," said. Capt. Su Johnson, 35th Aircraft Maintenance Unit Officer in Charge. Without (the) Wolf Pack maintainers’ pride and aggressive attitude to succeed, Exercise Cobra Gold would not have been successful."

Davis has averaged about 50 work hours a week, overseeing maintenance operations and inspections so pilots are able to conduct their training without delay or complications.

"I'm thankful for the many opportunities this career has given me the last 10 years," Davis said. "It makes you really appreciate the job, even on the tougher days.

During deployments and exercises such as Cobra Gold, you really get to see the bigger picture, and how your work contributes to and impacts the mission."
Davis plans to enjoy the time he has left in Thailand and in Korea, before starting his next chapter at Misawa Air Base, Japan.